Trump vows to respond swiftly to N. Korea missile launch

Breaking
Breaking

President Trump vowed Tuesday to respond swiftly to North Korea's latest missile launch, yet provided no details on whether his administration will take military action against the regime, The Washington Examiner reported.

"As you probably have heard and some of you have reported, a missile was launched a little while ago from North Korea," Trump told reporters at the White House hours after Pyongyang launched an intercontinental ballistic missile on Tuesday, following a more than two-month pause in missile tests.

 

President Trump on Tuesday vowed to respond swiftly to North Korea's latest missile launch, yet provided no details on whether his administration will take military action against the regime.

"As you probably have heard and some of you have reported, a missile was launched a little while ago from North Korea," Trump told reporters at the White House hours after Pyongyang launched an intercontinental ballistic missile on Tuesday, following a more than two-month pause in missile tests.

"I will only tell you that we will take care of it. We have [Defense Secretary Jim] Mattis in the room with us, and we've had a long discussion on it," he added.

"A little over two and a half hours ago, North Korea launched an intercontinental ballistic missile," Mattis said. "It went higher, frankly, than any previous shot they've taken. The research and development effort on their part to continue building ballistic missiles that can threaten everywhere in the world basically. And in response, the South Koreans have fired some pinpoint missiles out into the water to make certain North Korea understands that they could be taken under fire by our ally.

"The bottom line is it's a continued effort to build a ballistic missile threat that endangers world peace, regional peace and certainly the United States," Mattis said.

Trump was briefed on the missile launch while visiting Senate Republicans on Capitol Hill.

 

He later addressed the situation at a White House meeting with congressional GOP leaders, which their Democratic counterparts chose to skip.

"In light of the missile launch, probably they’ll be here very quickly or at least discussions will start taking place," Trump said.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said the North Korean missile appeared to have landed in his country's "exclusive economic zone." The South Korean military conducted a "precision missile-firing drill" after the missile landed, military officials told NBC.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has fired 22 missiles since February this year, with the stated goal of developing nuclear warheads that are capable of reaching the mainland United States.

The latest test follows the Trump administration's recent decision to return North Korea to the State Department's list of state sponsors of terrorism.

 







Last Modified: 11 29 2017 12:50 AM

Short Link



No Comments

Add Comment E-mail will not be published. Please fill required fields. *